When people fall on hard times, sometimes drugs are the only thing they can turn to with any certainty. People will do anything for drugs.

Some manage to maintain a job in between their sessions and use it recreationally.

The lowest of lives who require the highest highs don’t have that ability.

Their whole life falls apart to make room for more drugs, and they do far worse things to chase that fleeting feeling of satisfaction. They rob, they steal, they give up their body – or the bodies of others.

April Corcoran was sentenced to 51 years in prison when she was found guilty of selling her 11-year-old daughter’s body for sexual favors in exchange for heroin.

Her need for a high cost her daughter everything but her life, and it sent her to jail with no hope of redemption.




Dearborn County Sheriff’s Office

10 /10 All For A Fix

April Corcoran had a relationship with Shandell Willingham, her drug dealer. She allegedly worked for Willingham at first as a business associate.

She would clean homes and businesses to keep his other job a secret. She was incredibly poor, going so far as to live in a tent in her parent’s backyard.

She continued working intermittently while also raising her daughter in poverty. She had separated from her husband at some point as well and may have been receiving the necessary support from him while he worked elsewhere.




9 /10 Chasing The High

When money wasn’t enough or ran out, April turned to her dealer and made a deal.

She brought up the idea of giving him free rein to sexually assault her daughter in controlled sessions when he wanted to exchange for her usual doses of heroin.

The dealer agreed and started raping her when she was just 11 years old. These assaults happened four times between February and June of 2014.






Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office

8 /10 Cycle Of Abuse

April’s daughter was found to have been both vaginally and anally violated by the older man. April also offered or was suggested to videotape the sessions at some point.

While this provided authorities with ample evidence of her wrongdoings, the fact that it happened at all was a matter of disgust.

The judge who sentenced April Corcoran, Leslie Ghiz, said it was “by far the worst thing that has come before this court.”

When the daughter was done, April would also give her heroin, which was extremely dangerous and caused her to vomit and pass out, both common reactions to heroin for underage users.

7 /10 The Victim

April’s daughter moved in with her father and stepmother sometime after June. It was then that she described the horrors she lived through.

The case was brought forth through them to the police, and April entered a guilty plea in exchange for a lesser sentence.

Her daughter was unable to testify at the trial, which could have led her mother to face more severe charges, but the mental burden was too much.

The daughter confessed to suicidal thoughts and was placed under intensive care, and even underwent surgery for the damages caused to her body.

She was given medication to help deal with the pains that the heroin put on her body, as she was under the addictive effects.

6 /10 Slow Justice

The perpetrator of the assaults, Willingham, was put on trial a few years later and was sentenced in 2018.

The judge overseeing the case was the same one who convicted his partner in crime, April when the investigations and trials began.

He pled guilty and was given a 30-year prison sentence for his plea and the repeat condition of the victim being unable to face him in court to testify.

Judge Ghiz was so disgusted by the case he said, “I have not seen a worse case,” and, “I can barely look at you.”

5 /10 Cincinnati Surprise

Unfortunately, even as the girl got justice for the crimes against her, many people who covered or heard of the case dismissed it.

Neighbors who lived near where it all happened were not surprised. Some even purported that it wasn’t even unusual for things like that to happen.

Things like animal abuse and random fights are reportedly every day enough in rural Ohio that they aren’t usually given attention.

4 /10 Long Road

The girl is still protecting her father and under medication to overcome the detrimental physical and mental effects.

Her grandmother lamented at what she saw when she was able to meet her granddaughter. Moreover, she was utterly shocked how April could have done such a thing.

Before becoming addicted to heroin, everyone involved in April’s life reported her to be the right person and a loving mother.

3 /10 The Real Fight

The case sparked up outrage over the heroin crisis in the community. During the indictment, the county prosecutor Joseph T Deters cited the case as more disturbing than many he had seen.

Domestic abuse is a problem that is only made worse by the presence of illegal drugs. The effects are farther reaching than just within the home environment.

The Corcoran case put a new highlight on just how endemic the opium crisis is in rural middle America, a problem which has been allowed to continue for too long.

2 /10 An Ongoing Epidemic

The Department of Justice and the Ohio Department of Health had recognized the problems as far back as 2007 when the presence of illegal opioids and heroin-related overdoses and deaths reached national levels.

Ohio has been recognized as the leading state involved in the distribution, and deaths from, heroin and other opioid substances in the entire country.

1 /10 Fighting The Current

It seems like very little can be done to stop such a wide-scale problem. Efforts to criminalize the drugs further for possession and manufacturing don’t result in expected arrests.

More addicts are created every year, from wandering vagrants to curious teenagers and even unlucky parents who need a way to feel calm in a scary world.

Where parents are involved, children are always affected, some in far worse ways than others.

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